Guest blog: Resolutions and Job Seeking

Steph Cutler, Making Lemonade

 

Today’s guest blog has been written by Steph Cutler. Steph is a partially sighted employment trainer and coach. She supports visually impaired people to achieve meaningful employment and helps raise awareness of disability issues with employers through her company Making Lemonade. She can be followed on twitter at @Steph_Cutler. Here is her blog:

 

 

It’s that time of year when talk turns to resolutions. This year as I looked ahead at what I want to achieve in 2013 it struck me how the principles of setting successful goals and seeking employment have a great many similarities.

As a coach I regularly work with people who achieve their goals.  One thing all these people have in common is that they will all tell you it wasn’t easy. Let’s face it, if it was easy you wouldn’t need to set it as a goal or a resolution and there would be far fewer smokers, overweight people and more people exercising. Looking for and gaining work is also not easy, especially if you have a disability or long-term health condition. I know this from personal experience, I found it disproportionately difficult finding work after experiencing sight loss, and I know the disabled job seekers I regularly work with rarely find it easy.

From a coaching perspective, there are five questions which can help you set a resolution that you are seriously going to strive to achieve.

Ask yourself:

1.    Have I got a clear picture of where I am now and what it is I want to achieve?

2.    Do I have a written plan and does my goal have a deadline?

3.    Am I sufficiently passionate about achieving my goal?

4.    Do I strongly believe I can achieve my goal?

5.    Do I have the absolute determination to see my goal through regardless of what other people say, think, or do?

As you would expect,  I am going to say that you need to be able to say ‘yes’ to all of the above questions to give yourself the best shot. However, let’s take a minute to look at these in a little more detail AND apply them to job seeking.

1.    Have I got a clear picture of where I am now and what it is I want to achieve?

It is important that you have a clear picture of what it is you want to achieve and you maintain your focus on this. I know this can be hard if you are not exactly sure what you want to do work wise. Spend some time eliminating what you don’t want and being as specific as you can about what you do. The reason I say this is that working towards something vague is far harder than when you have clarity about what it is you want to achieve.

2.    Do I have a written plan and does my goal have a deadline?

Draw up a plan that works for you which includes steps you are committed to taking to get where you want to be. Written plans and deadlines help prevent procrastination. The fact that you put your goals on paper (or on a Dictaphone or computer) is an act of commitment and your goal is then real.

In 1953 Yale University carried out some research on goal setting! They sampled a group of final year students and found that 4% had goals that were written down. 20 years later the researchers went back to the sample group to find out how they were doing. The 4% who had written down their goals were streets ahead of the rest of the group when it came to indications that might suggest success. Each individual within the 4% group was financially secure; indeed as a group they were worth more than the other 96% – who did not write down their goals put together.

3.    Am I sufficiently passionate about achieving my goal?

Passion puts action into your plans and intentions. Without passion you will struggle to motivate yourself to achieve your goals, regardless how worthy your goal is or how workable your plan. This can only come from you, so you should feel excited about hearing you have been the successful candidate.

4.    Do I strongly believe I can achieve my goal?

Sorry to sound harsh but….if you don’t believe then why would anyone else? Keep reaffirming to yourself that you can do this, you are capable and you have what it takes. You are going to have to persuade a potential employer of this and it is WAY more compelling if you believe it too.

5.    Do I have the absolute determination to see my goal through regardless of what other people say, think, or do?

You will need to develop a strong determination to follow through on your plan. Actively seeking work can be a thankless task and you will very likely experience knock-backs along the way. The people who succeed into employment are the ones that persevere and are determined. Unfortunately, many capable and talented people, disabled and non-disabled, do not achieve their employment goals because they lose the determination to keep applying.

I’m not going to wish you luck, as I am not a big believer in luck when it comes to gaining employment or keeping resolutions (note the absence of luck in my top five tips). I am going to wish you the very best for the year ahead, whether you have made a resolution or not. Hope 2013 is fulfilling and fun.

 

To advertise jobs on Evenbreak go here – http://www.evenbreak.co.uk/employers/

To find jobs on Evenbreak go here – http://www.evenbreak.co.uk/jobs/

To make a donation to Evenbreak go here – https://localgiving.com/charity/evenbreak

 

 

 

One thought on “Guest blog: Resolutions and Job Seeking

  1. Hi Steph

    the importance of goal setting cannot be underestimated. It is the goal, with a strong underlying ‘why I have to do this’ that keeps us going when challenges arise, and they will.

    I sometimes think about this like wading in knee deep water that flowing in the opposite direction to the way you’re heading. You can make progress but you have to keep at it.

    Regards

    Garry

    Like

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