How wise is recruiting for ‘culture fit’?

I hear so many recruiters say they are looking for ‘culture fit’ when assessing candidates. Is this wise? In my experience, very rarely.

Culture is defined as “the way of life, especially the general customs and beliefs of a particular group of people at a particular time” in the Cambridge English Dictionary. Or, put more simply, ‘the way we do things around here’. Seeking out culture fit in candidates assumes that ‘the way we do things around here’ is the best, or even the only way things should be done.

The risk (and I think it’s a big risk) is that the practice of appointing people who share your customs and beliefs feeds into ‘group think’. This is where decision-makers sit around violently agreeing with each other, seeing every situation from the same viewpoint. It has been described as “A phenomenon that occurs when the desire for group consensus overrides people’s common sense desire to present alternatives, critique a position, or express an unpopular opinion. Here, the desire for group cohesion effectively drives out good decision-making and problem solving.” (source)

An organisational culture which has become complacent in thinking it already has all of the answers and can’t be improved prevents growth, innovation, disruption and is potentially dangerous to its future success. Including people who will look at issues through fresh eyes, with different ways of thinking and perspectives, and who will question and challenge the status quo is surely more healthy for the business?

Often, those organisations looking for culture fit are afraid of being questioned or challenged. They want people similar to them, with similar ways of thinking, who will just seamlessly slip in to the organisation without causing any ripples. Whilst this may be easier and more comfortable in the short-term, the long-term risks to the business can be huge.

The world is changing. Rapidly. Those who rely on ‘but we’ve always done it this way’ are denying the reality of the need to change, innovate and develop. Those who look for new, exciting and different ways to do things are able to not just adapt to the changing business environment, but to influence that change.

The next time you are recruiting, instead of looking for someone who will disappear into the background of your existing culture, actively seek someone who might challenge and question the status quo. Someone who is different from you. Someone who brings different experiences and ways of thinking with them. Are you brave enough?

To advertise jobs on Evenbreak go here – http://www.evenbreak.co.uk/employers/

To find jobs on Evenbreak go here – http://www.evenbreak.co.uk/jobs

10 Top Tips for Becoming Disability Confident

 

Disability confident logo

The Disability Confident scheme supports employers to make the most of the talents disabled people can bring to your workplace. It has three levels. Evenbreak was one of the first few organisations to achieve level 3 (leader). Essentially, being disability confident means removing barriers that disabled people might face. Here are our top tips:

  1. Know why you are doing this

There are dozens of benefits of employing disabled people. Do it to access the talent you need, not out of some kind of misguided sympathy!

  1. Get buy-in from leaders

Inclusion affects the whole business, and has to be led from the top. Leaders play a vital role in modelling best practice and creating an open and inclusive culture.

  1. Involve disabled people throughout the process

The real experts on inclusion are disabled people themselves. Involve disabled employees, or invite disabled people to give you feedback. Employee networks are great for this.

  1. Review your recruitment processes to ensure they are inclusive

Pro-actively attract disabled candidates. Also, CVs and interviews may not reflect the talents of a disabled candidate. Ensure you use relevant, accessible and inclusive application and assessment methods. How accessible is your recruitment process?

  1. Provide workplace adjustments

Employers should offer and provide necessary adjustments throughout the recruitment process and during employment. These enable disabled employees to work effectively.

  1. Support existing employees who are or who become disabled

2% of people of working age acquire an impairment or long-term health condition every year. Make sure you don’t lose valuable people by being unprepared to be flexible.

  1. Train and equip all staff to be confident and competent around inclusion

It’s important that all staff are trained in unconscious bias and disability awareness, and have access to resources to ensure their confidence and competence in inclusion.

  1. Remove any barriers to career progression

Employing disabled people is just the start. A disability confident company will also help to nurture that talent by offering training, mentoring and opportunities for progression.

  1. Provide opportunities for engaging disabled people

These might include work trials, apprenticeships, internships, job shadowing, work experience, holiday placement or other opportunities.

  1. Encourage your supply chain to be disability confident too

Once you are disability confident, ensure that partners and suppliers follow your good practice. Ensure that inclusion forms part of your procurement process.

 

To advertise jobs on Evenbreak go here – http://www.evenbreak.co.uk/employers/

To find jobs on Evenbreak go here – http://www.evenbreak.co.uk/jobs

When should we start employing disabled people?

Image shows the word ‘now!’ on a torn out piece of paper, surrounded by other words including ‘someday’, ‘another day’, ‘never’.

When we talk to employers about employing disabled people, one of the first questions you often ask us is what you should put in place first.

In some ways, that’s an odd question, because you are almost certainly already employing disabled people. You just might not know. Most impairments (around 80%) are not visible, so many people just don’t mention them. Consider dyslexia, diabetes, asthma, chronic pain, autism, mental health conditions and so on.

You are almost certainly already employing disabled people…

Apart from that, if we waited for organisations to become completely inclusive before employing disabled people, no disabled person would ever be employed! The important starting point is to just get started. It’s a virtuous circle – the more disabled people you employ, the easier it gets, and the more confident you become.

On the whole, disabled candidates understand that no organisation will get everything right every time, but if there is a willingness to listen and learn that’s enough.

Disability inclusion is, of course, at the heart of everything we do at Evenbreak, and we are still learning. We are incredibly lucky because we have loads of opportunities to learn – from our amazing candidates, our enthusiastic employers, and each other. Between the nine people on the Evenbreak team, we have a wide array of impairments and learn something new from each other all the time.

We are still learning too…

Our recent video asks a number of disabled people what their advice to employers would be, and in their own way, each one of them said: “just do it!”.

The danger is that if you wait until everyone is trained, all the buildings are made accessible, all the policies are changed and all the budgets are in place, it will never happen. You can be working on all of those things in parallel with attracting disabled people to help you on that journey. Sometimes the ‘we can’t do it until …” becomes an excuse rather than a genuine concern. In particular, budgets! If this is really a priority for you, you’ll find the budget from somewhere.

So – what’s really stopping you?

To advertise jobs on Evenbreak go here – http://www.evenbreak.co.uk/employers/

To find jobs on Evenbreak go here – http://www.evenbreak.co.uk/jobs

Want a welcoming workplace?  Accessibility isn’t just about the physical building.

 

Here are 5 things you can do to make your workplace more accessible for disabled visitors.

I love to travel and visit new people and places. Planning, not so much. When I am well, travel is my favourite past time. I rarely plan. When I am unwell, it becomes overwhelming and planning is essential. For most disabled people, planning is not a choice. The outcome of a visit often depends on three things: The quality and depth of information available. The accessibility of the destination. And the welcome you receive. Here’s how to become part of the solution:

 

1) Check the ‘how to find us’ information on your organisation’s website.

Does it give simple, explicit instructions for all types of travel? Does it include a direct telephone number to call for directions if lost? Does it tell the visitor how accessible your workplace is? Every tourism destination should have an accessibility guide. A quick google of a few local venues shows access information on all. Why don’t businesses do the same? Disabled people work too! For a quick and easy win, take a photograph of the entrance to your organisation’s building.  Add it to the ‘how to find us’ page of your website. It will make life easier for everyone that visits.

2) Review your signage.

Any community nurse, paramedic or postman, will tell you how bad we Brits are at showing people how to find us. Subtle, signage that blends into the building might be appealing, but it won’t help your visitors find you. Consider making life easier with signage that is clear and visible from a distance and fitted in an appropriate place. If that isn’t possible then a photograph of your organisation’s building becomes even more important.

3) Consider asking your visitor if they have any additional needs before they visit.

Having an open conversation about a disability is hard for many people.  So much so, that many people avoid the subject altogether. But it can make all the difference for a disabled visitor.  It’s completely reasonable to ask if a person has any additional needs.  And it is completely reasonable for a disabled person to choose whether to disclose those needs. But choice is everything. Click here to learn more about disability etiquette.

4) Are your staff disability aware?

Esi Hardy, MD of Celebrating Disability, talked to me about the importance of a culture of inclusion in the workplace: “You can implement all the right tools, policies and procedures to make disabled customers feel welcome in your business, but your staff are quite often the first port of call. If they don’t have the right attitude or don’t understand disability, all your efforts will go to waste. Embedding a culture of inclusion supports your staff to understand what is expected of them in terms of empathy, diversity, tolerance and acceptance”.  Effective diversity training empowers staff and experience tells us that companies that value an inclusive culture are a better experience for everyone, employees and customers alike.

5) How accessible is your website?

Everyone values an easy to navigate website. Interestingly, websites that are made accessible for people with sight impairment or issues with manual dexterity are far easier for everyone to use. Basic tools such as Alt Tags, that allow screen readers to read a picture on the screen, will enable a blind or partially sighted person to experience what you are trying to show them. And it’s not just users. Search engines prefer them too! Designing for accessibility is just good business. To find out more about making your service accessible, click here.

To advertise jobs on Evenbreak click here

To find jobs on Evenbreak click here

And to find out more about best practice around disability in the workplace take a peek here

 

The rewards of an open and flexible recruitment process

In this blog I described the recruitment process Evenbreak used in a recent hiring round. Any recruitment process can only really be evaluated by the outcomes it produces. In our case, we were aiming to attract a number of diverse candidates who had the qualities and strengths required to do the two roles we were trying to fill.

As described previously, we received over forty applications from a diverse range of incredibly talented people, and had the somewhat enviable ‘problem’ of identifying the most suitable ones. They had a lot to live up to, as our existing team, at the risk of sounding immodest (and just a little smug), is pretty remarkable.

In the end, although we were advertising two roles, we just couldn’t choose between two candidates for one of them, and decided to employ them both. So the Evenbreak team gained three new members instead of two. I’d like to introduce them to you.

Kiana, Candidate Engagement Manager

I must confess, my own prejudices kicked in a bit with Kiana at first. How could a young woman of only 24 have the life experience required to carry out such a crucial role for the business? However, I very quickly understood that she has the most amazingly creative mind (demonstrated in part by a videoshe had produced), and had all the qualities we had hoped for and so much more. Her degree in film-making, her experience in campaigning, her human rights approach to disability, and her ability to communicate complex issues articulately and persuasively made her the perfect choice.

Other employers may have hesitated because she has Spinal Muscular Atrophy, meaning she requires a lot of personal assistance, and as a full time wheelchair user would need to work in an accessible buiding. They sometimes also make (inaccurate) assumptions about what she is, or isn’t, capable of. If so, it would be their loss entirely. She may not be able to remove the top from her pen independently, but she engages really well with people, organisations and media and is already making a huge positive impact on the team and Evenbreak’s stakeholders. Thank goodness I ignored my initial prejudice (there’s perhaps a lesson there for us all!).

Cassandra (Employer Engagement Manager)

Cassandra was the first person to respond to the advert, and she was very keen, but concerned that she “might not be disabled enough” as her impairment is a mental health condition. We laughed that in most recruitment situations candidates would be concerned that they might be considered “too disabled”, and it was good to have turned the tables for once.

Cass immediately appealed, because she had a diverse background, including PR and health. She is particularly talented in marketing and social media, and has great writing skills. Her enthusiasm and motivation were what first impressed me, along with her strong desire to make the world, especially the world of work, more inclusive and accessible to disabled people. Another creative mind (like Kiana), she comes up with some amazing ideas, and is incredibly pro-active at finding solutions to improve the way we work. Evenbreak is already more effective as a result.

Adam (Employer Engagement Manager)

When it comes to working with large employers, Adam has experience in spades. Most of his working life has been spent working and engaging with a range of diverse companies. Over those years he has developed remarkable skills in problem-solving, strategic thinking, analytical skills and stakeholder engagement. His progressive condition, Multiple Sclerosis, had made his previous job increasingly difficult, and so reluctantly he left. His personal experience in trying to find work flexible enough to accommodate his health condition attracted him to the approach Evenbreak takes to addressing some of those problems.

Adam describes his immense skillset as ‘old school’ and ‘traditional’. I describe them, even after only two months, as ‘impressive’ and ‘successful’. He is already making some productive relationships with existing employers and ensuring they gain maximum benefit from using Evenbreak.

 

In addition to the demonstrable and amazing qualities that these individual people possess, the magic really happens when they come together as a team.  The four of us share fundamental values around inclusion and diversity, and also have different and complementary life experiences, work experiences, skills, qualifications and talents which combine together to form something really special. It’s early days – we have only been working together for a couple of months at the time of writing – but I feel really excited and optimistic about the future of Evenbreak.

I’m not sure that this would have happened with a ‘traditional’ recruitment process. And I know that such an open and flexible process won’t suit every employer. However, are there elements you could take from it to improve yours? The rewards are plain to see!

To advertise jobs on Evenbreak go here – http://www.evenbreak.co.uk/employers/

To find jobs on Evenbreak go here – http://www.evenbreak.co.uk/jobs

Evenbreak’s Own Recruitment Process

We advise employers to make their recruitment processes as accessible as possible, but do we practice what we preach? Here is the process we used in our recent hiring round, looking to fill two roles.

As a small social enterprise aimed at improving disability inclusion in the workplace, we have a policy of only employing disabled people ourselves. Our recruitment process therefore needs to be specifically developed to be both accessible and inclusive. However, we are also keen that our team is diverse in a much broader sense – diversity in terms of type of impairment, age, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, culture, thinking styles, educational background, location and so on.

We advertise vacancies on our own job board, which is promoted in various ways to disabled people (partnerships with universities, colleges, charities, welfare-to-work providers, Jobcentre Plus, disability journals, social media, online and offline forums, etc).

We offer decent salaries and holiday entitlements and development opportunities as well as flexible working to ensure we attract the best candidates.

The adverts describe our mission and values, an overview of the role, and how we will support the candidate (smart-working, flexibility, relevant adjustments etc). We focus on strengths rather than competences, making it clear that qualifications and experience aren’t as important as drive, motivation and values, and that any protected characteristics (as defined in the Equality Act 2010) are irrelevant – our only interest is in what they can bring to the role.

Every candidate who meets the minimum criteria is sent a job description and put through to the next stage automatically (this applies to disabled candidates, but as we only employ disabled people it applies to all candidates who identify as disabled).

The rest of the process – the assessment of each candidate’s suitability for the role – is conducted on their terms. We state that we want them to have the best opportunity to shine in the assessment stage, and that we know the usual CV and interview process doesn’t work for everyone. Candidates are encouraged to demonstrate their strengths in any way which works for them – for example, written submission, video, conversation (face-to-face, telephone, Skype or email/messenger), examples of previous work etc.

Candidates can contact us (through telephone or email or whatever medium is accessible to them) to ask any questions they may have about the selection process, the company, or the role itself.

At each stage in the process candidates are asked if they would like any adjustments. As they know all the other candidates are also disabled, it is easier to request adjustments without worrying that this may disadvantage them.

Each candidate then engages in their chosen way to demonstrate they have the strengths we are looking for. The hiring decision is based purely on which candidate shows the most potential to add value to the business.

Each candidate (successful or otherwise) is offered comprehensive feedback and further advice if requested.

The outcomes of the process was that we had 41 applications – any one of whom would have been ideal. Written submissions were sent, telephone conversations had, face-to-face meetings took place, videos were watched, links were followed. Each candidate had the traits we were looking for. What a great problem to have! We were spoilt for choice.

In the end, we appointed three candidates, as we couldn’t choose between two for one role, and reluctantly rejected the remaining  37 candidates. The three candidates we appointed have turned out to be just the most amazing people, both individually and as a team (I’ll introduce them to you in a further blog!). Feedback from unsuccessful candidates was that they found the process open and inviting, and even tho they hadn’t got the job, many had increased their confidence during the process and found the feedback we gave them useful.

The process resulted in attracting a diverse group of ideal candidates, three amazing new employees, and 37 great advocates for Evenbreak, some of whom we can hopefully employ in the future.

To advertise jobs on Evenbreak go here – http://www.evenbreak.co.uk/employers/

To find jobs on Evenbreak go here – http://www.evenbreak.co.uk/jobs

5 Tips to Make Your Job Adverts More Inclusive

Here at Evenbreak, we talk about diversity, inclusivity and overcoming barriers daily.  But how do employers keep disability awareness up front? Writing a job advert that appeals to disabled candidates is a great place to start! Employing disabled people means your workforce is far more likely to gain insight and understanding.  It’s far more likely to talk openly about disability and far more likely to challenge the status quo. It also brings huge business benefits to the company (but that’s another blog and indeed a book!).

Here’s how to write a job ad that appeals:

1. Make it clear from the offset that YOUR company commits to equality.

Disabled candidates have already had to overcome many challenges. They often face discrimination daily. They are less likely to engage with companies that only pay lip service to equality. The paragraph that begins “We are an equal opportunities employer…” is often dropped at the end of a job ad.  Does anyone ever utter a ‘yippee’ at seeing this included? Does anyone ever read to the end of the job ad? A study by TheLadders, found that job seekers spend an average of 49.7 seconds reading a job advert before deciding whether it was a fit. Instead, please shout out about your inclusive culture at the top of the job ad. Talk to job seekers in a human voice about the changes your company has made to make sure they are open to all. Tell us about your culture and any initiatives you’ve launched. Add a bit of personality – this is your chance to sparkle! For tips on writing in a human voice, have a peek at what Founder of Human Workplace Liz Ryan has to say on the subject.

2. Avoid the never-ending list of bullet pointed job responsibilities.

It’s understandable that recruiting managers have a long list in mind of skills they’d like for each role. But this approach can at best, turn off brilliant candidates. At worst, it makes companies look delusional, if the list of wants doesn’t tally up with the benefits offered.  Disabled candidates are very unlikely to apply for jobs they don’t believe they’re qualified for. If anything, candidates are usually overqualified.  One study found more than half of disabled people have applied for jobs they know they are overqualified for. Instead of listing ‘employer wants’ for a role, consider listing only the essential ‘employer needs’. Use the extra word count to market your company to candidates. To receive three times as many applications and attract a better quality of candidate write a job ad that focuses on candidate needs. Not employers.

3. Tell candidates what you do differently and how you work smart.

Smart companies have fast cottoned on to the benefits of flexible working. With today’s technology there’s no need to commute an hour, to sit at a desk to work, to commute another hour home. Agile working is one of the smart working initiatives used by savvy employers to add value to their workforce.

Some benefits to employers include:

  • access to a more diverse talent pool
  • reduced attrition
  • increased productivity

Some benefits to employees include:

  • opportunities for disabled candidates
  • a better quality of life
  • reduced travel costs
  • increased time spent with family

By embracing smart working you’ll be able to attract a greater number of disabled candidates and a larger pool of talent.  Not convinced about smart working? Why not try it for a day and sign up to the Smarter Working Initiative.

4. Be mindful of the language you use.

Job ads often come peppered with industry specific jargon.  Acronyms and corporate buzz words like “KPI,” “onboarding”, “ITIL”, “compliance” are off putting.  These can not only send your job seeker to sleep (the acronym KPI has the same impact on me as a strong sedative); But also alienate potential candidates unfamiliar with your company’s lingo. Instead, use straightforward language. Tell candidates more about the potential career pathway offered. What does the job entail day to day? What is your company’s mission? What skills might your ideal candidate have?

5. Make it clear you judge candidates only on how well they fit the job criteria.

More and more businesses are signing up to become Disability Confident Employers. The scheme helps people identify those employers committed to equality in the workplace. Disabled candidates look for employers with good recruitment policies.  If your company:

  • is a Disability Confident Employer
  • offers a guaranteed interview scheme
  • uses disabled jobs boards such as Evenbreak

Then make sure this is obvious across your job ads, social media and marketing materials.  Tell candidates about what makes you great, they’re keen to find you!

We learn daily from Evenbreak candidates and the Employers that advertise with us.  Please tell us what turns you off about job ads and what makes you want to apply?

Cassandra Leese, Employer Engagement Manager, Evenbreak

To advertise jobs on Evenbreak go here – http://www.evenbreak.co.uk/employers/

To find jobs on Evenbreak go here – http://www.evenbreak.co.uk/jobs

Show how much you care about healthcare.

 

Do you care about maintaining standards in the nursing and midwifery professions? Do you care about people, fairness and transparency?

Then you should join the Nursing and Midwifery Council’s Fitness to Practise panel.

The Nursing and Midwifery Council regulates nurses and midwives in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales. We exist to protect the public, setting standards of education, training, conduct and performance so that nurses and midwives can deliver high quality healthcare throughout their careers. Most nurses and midwives do uphold professional standards and work hard to keep their skills and knowledge up to date, but things can occasionally go wrong. When this happens, we have clear and transparent processes to investigate nurses and midwives who fall short of our standards.

This is where you could help make a big difference.

We are currently looking for people to sit on our Fitness to Practise panel. As an independent panel member you will hear and make decisions on any cases that have been referred to the committee.

We are looking to build a panel made up of people from a range of backgrounds and experience, including people living with disabilities. You must be able to make logical, fair and balanced decisions, work well within a team, and be empathetic and adaptable. You may have developed these skills in a range of different situations.

There are vacancies for registrant panel members (nurses and midwives) and lay members. You can hear a registrant panel member describing her experiences in this video.

If you have never considered a role like this before, don’t let this put you off from applying. Full training and support is provided to enable you to make a positive impact.

You would be required for at least ten days per year, and the payment is £310 per day.

Please visit www.nmcfuture.com for more details.

To advertise jobs on Evenbreak go here – http://www.evenbreak.co.uk/employers/

To find jobs on Evenbreak go here – http://www.evenbreak.co.uk/jobs

Using SEO Services to Reach Disabled Candidates

One of the toughest aspects of recruiting candidates with disabilities is knowing where to find them in the first place. With the business benefits associated with employing disabled people, this is not only a challenge, but a necessity.

Rather than advertise through online job sites, or search through cold email, LinkedIn, colleague recommendations or more, there is a straightforward solution which will both allow recruiters to save valuable time, and is also highly effective – using SEO services in order to specifically target candidates with disabilities.

What is SEO?

SEO – or, ‘Search Engine Optimisation’ – refers to information and content you find by typing in queries to a search engine, such as google. Everything you see on the first page is there due to careful research, and has been sprinkled with certain keywords (along other search-friendly terms and more), in order to make it the most relevant to the specific search which is being performed. It is notoriously difficult to know how to do this correctly, and is best left to the professionals if you’re looking to achieve positive results.

How Can SEO Services Help Me Recruit Candidates with Disabilities?

As mentioned above, knowing which keywords your ideal users – in this case, potential candidates with disabilities – will be using to make searches. Professional SEO services will help find your target audience, and then the types of queries they are typing into search engines, and any other related keywords or queries. Then, they will either optimise – rewrite or edit – your existing site content to include these keywords and other factors, or explain to you the types of content you should be writing in order to attract more of your target audience.

For example, if you’re looking to attract candidates with disabilities, one longtail keyword (a keyword which is actually a sentence) these people may be using would be ‘how to find a job if you have a disability’. SEO services would know how to capitalise on this, helping you to edit your content in order to include it. Then, the next time, and every time after, that longtail keyword was searched for, your content would be one of the first items to appear in the list.

Is My Business Suitable for SEO?

SEO is something which every type of business, employer and individual can use to help them be placed in front of the relevant people.

Whether you’re looking to recruit for a factory, retail, an office or more, SEO services can tailor your exact recruitment needs to reflect the type of candidate you’re searching for. For example, if you’re recruiting candidates with disabilities for your office, an SEO professional might find that keywords such as ‘find job in an office disabled’ and ‘office jobs for disabled people’ might be suitable terms to target.

SEO is incredibly adaptable to every type of business and need out there, and is astonishingly effective too – when done correctly. It will also save countless hours of trying to source candidates, allowing them to quite literally search for you, and get in touch.

To advertise jobs on Evenbreak go here – http://www.evenbreak.co.uk/employers/

To find jobs on Evenbreak go here – http://www.evenbreak.co.uk/jobs/

 

Channel 4 join Evenbreak!

Press release:

Channel 4 has today announced that it will advertise all of its future vacancies on a specialist job site run by and for disabled people.

Channel 4 hopes the initiative will attract even more applications from disabled people in a bid to further diversify its workforce and help disabled people break into the media industry.

The broadcaster’s commitment in promoting diversity is firmly established and well documented thanks to its unrivalled commitment during 2016, its Year of Disability. This included acclaimed coverage of the Rio Paralympics, and ground-breaking initiatives such as its £1m Superhumans Wanted campaign, which offered £1 million worth of commercial airtime to an advertiser prominently featuring disability in its adverts, and channel 4’s Rio Production Trainee scheme which saw more than 20 disabled trainees and mid-level staff work on its Rio Paralympic content.

Graeme Whippy, Disability Workplace Specialist at Channel 4, said: “Channel 4 took significant steps during the Year of Disability to increase the representation of disabled people on-screen, off-screen in production and in our own back yard. As we move into 2017 it’s critical that we maintain the momentum we built during the Year of Disability and build on its successes – hence the importance of our partnership with Evenbreak to facilitate a pipeline of disabled talent.”

In order to attract more disabled candidates Channel 4 has decided to advertise all of its vacancies onEvenbreak (opens in a new window), a specialist job board run by and for disabled people.

Channel 4 will be the first major broadcasting organisation to routinely post all of its vacancies on Evenbreak, demonstrating once again its commitment to diversity and offering opportunities to disabled people.

Nichola Ivory-Chapman, Head of Talent Acquisition at Channel 4, said: “Diversity is in Channel 4’s DNA and we know that recruiting talent from diverse backgrounds encourages our workforce to be vibrant, creative and think differently. It can be a challenge though to reach out to job seekers from under-represented groups which is why we wanted to partner with Evenbreak to help us attract applications from disabled people.”

Jane Hatton, Founder and Director of Evenbreak, said: “Channel 4 has demonstrated a genuine commitment to inclusion and accessibility, and Evenbreak is delighted to be involved in their programme to positively attract disabled candidates.”

To advertise jobs on Evenbreak go here – http://www.evenbreak.co.uk/employers/

To find jobs on Evenbreak go here – http://www.evenbreak.co.uk/jobs