Best Practice Case Studies: E.ON (1)

New Evenbreak client, E.ON recognises the importance of employing a diverse workforce, with colleagues who reflect the communities they operate in, the customers they serve and the partners they work with. They have put great effort into removing barriers from recruitment policies, processes and practises which may have had the potential to exclude disabled people. Diversity is at the heart of everything they do, including recruitment, selection, training and development. We are proud that they chose to use Evenbreak as partners in helping them attract more talented disabled people. In this blog, and others over the coming weeks, they will share with us stories about some of the very talented people working with them.

Miriam

Miriam, born blind to visually impaired parents, has been with E.ON for five years and is real asset to our Business Billing Team. After struggling to cope with a long commute to a full time job in an organisation with little awareness of diversity issues, Miriam applied to E.ON, telling us she was registered blind. “From the moment I applied they wanted to make sure I had the same chance as other non-disabled people in the recruitment process, so they asked what I needed,” she says. “I was impressed with the time taken to consider my situation and give me options, including allowing me a reader for the numerical assessment and providing Braille instructions for the roleplay – it instantly made me feel comfortable. When I found I was successful, they provided a lot of contact on the phone and even sent me a braille version of the contract.”

Prior to starting her role, E.ON worked closely alongside Miriam, eyesight charity Royal National Institute for the Blind and Access to Work to ensure that she had all the equipment she needed to carry out her new role, including specialist IT software, a screen reader to help her navigate the systems and access emails, and a braille keyboard and laptop for jotting down meter readings and account numbers. Miriam says “I also felt welcomed into the team by my manager. He invited me to attend team meetings before I started my role, proactively introduced me to colleagues and assigned me a buddy, which helped me settle in. My section manager has also been very understanding of my circumstances, supporting me when I had an operation a couple of years ago and ensuring I get all the equipment and support I need.” Black Labrador Tally, Miriam’s guide dog, has also become a welcomed addition to the team, sitting at her feet when not being cooed over by colleagues, and even has her own dedicated outside area.

“It’s proved to be the perfect job,” she says. “The key to it all has been the fact that no one has been afraid to ask what I need and then they actually listen to what I say. But the best thing about working for E.ON is simply the people you work with; my team, particularly the managers, have been fantastic, really helpful and supportive!”

 

It’s great to hear of a company who really does go out of its way to ensure that talented people like Miriam can contribute their skills and work comfortably within the team.

 

To advertise jobs on Evenbreak go here – http://www.evenbreak.co.uk/employers

To find jobs on Evenbreak go here – http://www.evenbreak.co.uk/jobs

To make a donation to Evenbreak go here – https://localgiving.com/charity/evenbreak

 

 

 

5 thoughts on “Best Practice Case Studies: E.ON (1)

  1. What I love about your blogs Jane are the threads about how much work means in respect of working within a supportive team. It’s so rewarding in more ways than one. And yes, Miriam sounds as if she’s a very valued employee and 5*s to E.ON for their commitment to a diverse workforce.

    Like

  2. This case history really does illustrate how proper co-operation between disabled staffers and employers can lead to excellent results on both sides. It’s a joy to see. (And it’s a joy to see Tally the black lab … I bet she is spoiled rotten by everyone!)

    Like

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