How to hunt for an inclusive employer

The world of work is changing. And I’m seeing that like my own priorities, candidates’ priorities have changed too. My last job search was vastly different from previous searches. I wasn’t looking for a specific role or a specific salary. The hours I worked weren’t as important. Or the location. I was looking for an inclusive employer with values aligned to my own. And a role that would enable me to have social impact. No easy feat!

Many of today’s candidates want flexibility, a positive culture, and work environment. And like me, they look for organisations with strong values. If you have a disability, a long-term health condition or carer responsibilities, these matter even more. So how do you hunt out a forward-thinking, inclusive employer? Here are a few of the things to consider…

Woman working on a computer

1) Their values are visible throughout the organisation

A website is a great place to start. Can you find their values? Is their website accessible? Do they show customers and candidates evidence of their ethics, values, and priorities? In contacts with the organisation, how are you treated? If you call up and ask about accessibility, what response do you receive?

2) They don’t just listen to their employees; they act too

Most employees want flexibility in their work. Has this been put into place or is it still being talked about? Do they advertise their vacancies as flexible? Do they have remote vacancies? Do they have employee networks? Are sickness and annual leave policies the legal minimum. Or is staff wellbeing prioritised?

3) It’s not just lip service; they commit to inclusion

Look for signs of positive action towards inclusion. How do they choose to attract candidates? Via mainstream, traditional strategies only? Do they put money and resources behind inclusion? Or is inclusion limited to a paragraph on their website? Do they purposefully target underrepresented groups to increase diversity? Look at their job adverts. Are they open to all or do they only appeal to a few? Are their values clear? Here’s a great example from Guidant Global of what to look for in a job advert.

In a nutshell, you’ll need to become something of a detective to find an organisation that walks the walk. But the result is worth it and for many, it can be life changing.

To keep in the loop about opportunities for candidates email info@evenbreak.co.uk or visit www.evenbreak.co.uk

Housing Association giant L&Q commits to disability inclusion with Evenbreak

L&Q has partnered with two leading not-for-profit organisations to ensure it is offering the best service to its disabled staff and residents. As part of their disability inclusion initiative, L&Q will work with Evenbreak, to reach and retain more talented disabled people.Image shows a picture of a wheelchair symbol with the words 'step free route' above an arrow

L&Q is also working with disability charity Scope to develop housing advice content for its website and advice line. The two organisations have worked together for the last 18 months to upskill L&Q’s employability service so that they can better engage and support their disabled residents in securing sustainable employment.

Disabled people are more than twice as likely to be unemployed as non-disabled people. To reduce the barriers facing disabled people, L&Q will advertise all its jobs on Evenbreak’s website, a specialist job board run by and for disabled people.

L&Q’s other disability inclusion initiatives for 2019 include:

  • Improving physical access for disabled staff, residents, and visitors over and above legal compliance“It’s important that there are no barriers to disabled people working at L&Q, and that includes at the very start of their journey as a prospective L&Q employee.”
  • Organising disability awareness training by Enhance UK
  • Upskilling staff so they can give great customer service to disabled residents
  • Reporting on the disability pay gap from 2019 as part of L&Q’s annual Fair Pay report
  • Offering flexible working for all its roles, including in its contact centre, which will break down barriers for disabled staff or carers
  • Becoming a Disability Confident committed employer, which means that candidates are guaranteed an interview if they meet the job criteria
  • Working with Genius Within to help staff understand ‘neurodiverse’ conditions such as autism

Jan Gale, Head of Diversity and Inclusion at L&Q, said: “By partnering with Evenbreak, we are investing in our people. We want our workforce to reflect the diverse make-up of our residents, and we also want to attract people with a wide range of different skills and expertise.

“If we can harness the creativity and innovation that comes from diverse teams, it will help us play our part in solving the housing crisis. There is a huge array of talent out there that organisations can’t afford to ignore as we seek to deliver quality services to our residents whilst building new homes to tackle the supply gap.

Jane Hatton, Founder and Director at Evenbreak, said: “We are delighted that L & Q are leading the way on disability inclusion for housing associations. The benefits of employing disabled people can have an enormous positive impact on all aspects of social housing, including having a more diverse workforce that residents can relate to. Advertising all of their vacancies on Evenbreak will support L&Q in being the type of organisation that excels.”

Stephanie Coulshed, Programme Lead at Scope said: “Based on our in-depth research into the information that disabled people need about housing, Scope’s content designers will collaborate with subject experts at L&Q to develop accessible advice that helps people solve problems. We believe that L&Q’s knowledge of housing issues and commitment to tackling them, combined with Scope’s expertise in content design, will result in an outstanding partnership that has real impact. “

If your organisation has an employment opportunity and you’d like to reach more diverse candidates, or if you have a disability and would like to find an opportunity with an inclusive employer, follow this link to Evenbreak or email adame@evenbreak.co.uk.

Employers, do you know how many disabled staff you employ?

Picture shows a question mark pointing to cogs pointing to a lightbulbI speak to employers about recruiting disabled staff on a daily basis. And I always ask this question. The response is always interesting and tells me a lot about an organisation.

Forward-thinking organisations can usually tell me this figure straight away. They also tell me they’re aware that the figure is very likely to be inaccurate. And if I’m having a great day they tell me what they’re doing to change this. They’re aware they don’t know the number of people with invisible disabilities. They’re aware they don’t know the number of employees with long term health conditions. They’re aware that often disabled people don’t disclose their condition. And for good reason.

Evenbreak candidates tell us that if they disclose their disability, they don’t get as many interviews. When they are employed, they often experience stigma and bullying. And fewer opportunities for career progression. So, if they don’t trust the employer, they don’t disclose it. And many disabled people don’t trust most employers. With good reason.  Take the word ‘disclose’ for a start.  Why not simply ‘tell’? Where else do you have to disclose something? Customs comes to my mind first! A quick internet search brought up this:

disclose verb

make (secret or new information) known. “they disclosed her name to the press” synonyms: reveal, make known, divulge, tell, impart, communicate, pass on, vouchsafe, unfold

allow (something hidden) to be seen. “he cleared away the grass and disclosed a narrow opening descending into the darkness” synonyms: uncover, expose to view, allow to be seen, reveal, show, exhibit, lay bare, bring to light; rare unclose “exploratory surgery disclosed an aneurysm”

It’s not brimming over with positivity, is it? What we all seem to forget is that different abilities, disability, long-term health conditions are normal. It’s part of life. Part of society. They shouldn’t need to be hidden or apologised for. And the battle for equal rights and opportunities shouldn’t be so utterly exhausting.

One day, I hope, it won’t be. Increasingly, organisations are being asked to ‘disclose’ the number of disabled people they employ. Organisations will have to explain the inconsistencies between officially disclosed disability and the actual disability figures given in staff surveys. And they’re being asked to consider the lack of representation of disabled people at senior levels.

So, there are a few questions for employers to ask themselves:

Do you know how many disabled people you employ?

Do you ask? If not, why not?

Do you know what difficulties disabled staff or those with long term health conditions experience while working for you?

Essentially, can you be trusted?

And if not… What actions are you taking to change this?

To attract disabled candidates and advertise jobs with Evenbreak click here.

To help all your employees become more confident and confident around disability inclusion, click here.

 

10 Top Tips for Becoming Disability Confident

 

Disability confident logo

The Disability Confident scheme supports employers to make the most of the talents disabled people can bring to your workplace. It has three levels. Evenbreak was one of the first few organisations to achieve level 3 (leader). Essentially, being disability confident means removing barriers that disabled people might face. Here are our top tips:

  1. Know why you are doing this

There are dozens of benefits of employing disabled people. Do it to access the talent you need, not out of some kind of misguided sympathy!

  1. Get buy-in from leaders

Inclusion affects the whole business, and has to be led from the top. Leaders play a vital role in modelling best practice and creating an open and inclusive culture.

  1. Involve disabled people throughout the process

The real experts on inclusion are disabled people themselves. Involve disabled employees, or invite disabled people to give you feedback. Employee networks are great for this.

  1. Review your recruitment processes to ensure they are inclusive

Pro-actively attract disabled candidates. Also, CVs and interviews may not reflect the talents of a disabled candidate. Ensure you use relevant, accessible and inclusive application and assessment methods. How accessible is your recruitment process?

  1. Provide workplace adjustments

Employers should offer and provide necessary adjustments throughout the recruitment process and during employment. These enable disabled employees to work effectively.

  1. Support existing employees who are or who become disabled

2% of people of working age acquire an impairment or long-term health condition every year. Make sure you don’t lose valuable people by being unprepared to be flexible.

  1. Train and equip all staff to be confident and competent around inclusion

It’s important that all staff are trained in unconscious bias and disability awareness, and have access to resources to ensure their confidence and competence in inclusion.

  1. Remove any barriers to career progression

Employing disabled people is just the start. A disability confident company will also help to nurture that talent by offering training, mentoring and opportunities for progression.

  1. Provide opportunities for engaging disabled people

These might include work trials, apprenticeships, internships, job shadowing, work experience, holiday placement or other opportunities.

  1. Encourage your supply chain to be disability confident too

Once you are disability confident, ensure that partners and suppliers follow your good practice. Ensure that inclusion forms part of your procurement process.

 

To advertise jobs on Evenbreak go here – http://www.evenbreak.co.uk/employers/

To find jobs on Evenbreak go here – http://www.evenbreak.co.uk/jobs

Five easy New Year’s resolutions to help you become a more inclusive employer

Two rows of chocolate cupcakes that spell out Happy 2019So many people hate New Year’s resolutions. They remind us of past failures and far too often include giving up chocolate. Which can seem wrong on so many levels… I’m a great fan of resolutions or goals. To me, they emphasise change, possibility, action. All things that I’m a fan of.

So, this year I’ve put together a teeny tiny list of resolutions for employers. Each one will make a difference to at least one person, immediately. Together you will have the beginnings of culture change. And you’ll be on your way to becoming an inclusive employer of choice. Plus… you won’t need to give up chocolate.

1)  See disabled people as valuable talent rather than problems to solve.  Employers that focus on employees’ strengths inspire growth and innovation.

2)  Ask disabled employees, customers and candidates for feedback.  And act on that feedback.  Employers that listen and act, inspire commitment.

Learn something new and become more inclusive…

3)  Take 30 minutes to learn about something that doesn’t affect you. A few weeks ago, I learnt the importance of capitalising the first letter of each word after using a hashtag. It allows screen reader software to read out each word separately. And makes them #EasierToRead! Thank you to the Royal National Institute of Blind People for this tip!

4) Share the good practice you develop and learn from others. There are many opportunities out there worth investigating. Evenbreak’s unlimited advertisers have access to our online community Evenbreaker’s. It encourages employers to talk openly about challenges and triumphs and we learn as a group. Disability networks (such as the Midlands Ability Group) connect employers committed to progress. They share best practice and events throughout the year.

5) Ensure your people are confident and competent around inclusion and accessibility. Provide training and ongoing access to learning resources for all employees. Not just the chosen few. I’ll admit this resolution has a cost implication. But the cultural return on investment will be huge.

 

To learn more about our best practice portal for ALL your employees or to advertise jobs with us contact info@evenbreak.co.uk

Alternatively, come and say hello to me on LinkedIn! https://www.linkedin.com/in/cassandraleese/

 

To find out more about the Midlands Ability Network, contact Becky Brooks: Becky.brooks@enei.org.uk

 

When should we start employing disabled people?

Image shows the word ‘now!’ on a torn out piece of paper, surrounded by other words including ‘someday’, ‘another day’, ‘never’.

When we talk to employers about employing disabled people, one of the first questions you often ask us is what you should put in place first.

In some ways, that’s an odd question, because you are almost certainly already employing disabled people. You just might not know. Most impairments (around 80%) are not visible, so many people just don’t mention them. Consider dyslexia, diabetes, asthma, chronic pain, autism, mental health conditions and so on.

You are almost certainly already employing disabled people…

Apart from that, if we waited for organisations to become completely inclusive before employing disabled people, no disabled person would ever be employed! The important starting point is to just get started. It’s a virtuous circle – the more disabled people you employ, the easier it gets, and the more confident you become.

On the whole, disabled candidates understand that no organisation will get everything right every time, but if there is a willingness to listen and learn that’s enough.

Disability inclusion is, of course, at the heart of everything we do at Evenbreak, and we are still learning. We are incredibly lucky because we have loads of opportunities to learn – from our amazing candidates, our enthusiastic employers, and each other. Between the nine people on the Evenbreak team, we have a wide array of impairments and learn something new from each other all the time.

We are still learning too…

Our recent video asks a number of disabled people what their advice to employers would be, and in their own way, each one of them said: “just do it!”.

The danger is that if you wait until everyone is trained, all the buildings are made accessible, all the policies are changed and all the budgets are in place, it will never happen. You can be working on all of those things in parallel with attracting disabled people to help you on that journey. Sometimes the ‘we can’t do it until …” becomes an excuse rather than a genuine concern. In particular, budgets! If this is really a priority for you, you’ll find the budget from somewhere.

So – what’s really stopping you?

To advertise jobs on Evenbreak go here – http://www.evenbreak.co.uk/employers/

To find jobs on Evenbreak go here – http://www.evenbreak.co.uk/jobs

Empowering abilities – what you need to know…

Image shows three face symbols. The first is sad, the second has been turned into a smile by a person’s hand and the third is neutral.

I recently read an article that made me grin. Dustin Maynard entitled his article ‘The Secret to Disability Inclusion’. It made a strong impression because everything he said was just so darn true. Disability inclusion isn’t as complicated as people think. Focus on what people can do, rather than what they can’t. Look for strengths first, look at what people can offer. Focus on ability, not the disability. Once this mindset is in place, the rest gets easier. Here are three simple mindset leaps for you and your organisation to soar with:

Mindset leap 1: Why hire disabled people? Won’t it be a load of hassle?

Quit looking at the negatives about disability that you see in the media. There are rather a lot of benefits your organisation can’t afford to miss out on. Are you ready? Here are just a few…

If you include disabled people in your search for talent, you’ve got a wider talent pool to recruit from and a greater chance of finding the best person for the job. Disabled people tend to stay in their jobs longer, increasing retention. We are just as productive as non-disabled people but have fewer workplace accidents. And less sick time. Disabled people and their families are consumers with valuable spending power (£249 billion a year in the UK alone). Can you afford to ignore this? The costs associated with inclusion are far less than you might think, and the benefits far outweigh them.

Mindset leap 2: What if we do/say the wrong thing?

There’s no doubt about it. This is a scary mindset to overcome. It’s easy to say the wrong thing, but equally easy to ask what language is preferred. And it’s easy to learn. One of the best benefits of employing disabled people is that we’ll help your organisational culture shift naturally. We offer a different viewpoint, a fresh perspective as it were. Inclusive cultures attract more customers and the best candidates. Diversity increases both innovation and the bottom line.

To help people jump over this hurdle, Evenbreak developed a best practice portal. It allows everyone in the organisation to have access to a comprehensive and practical set of resources. And it’s for everyone, not just senior leaders. The resources are kept bite-sized, so you can dip in and learn as time allows. And it’s developed by the real experts: disabled people and employers who are already implementing best practice.

Mindset leap 3: How did you say we start again?

Just do it. Have a read of Dustin’s excellent article. Look at ability rather than disability. And if you get in a pickle and want a hand, drop us a line at info@evenbreak.co.uk

Mental health in the workplace – why you, boss, matter most.

Mental health and leadership
Picture shows dictionary entry of the word leadership.

World Mental Health Day passed me by in a blur of tissues, hot lemon and honey and self-pity. I had planned on a less lurgy-ridden blog. I had looked forward to seeing the different campaigns on social media. I was all excited that finally, society’s mental wellbeing was on the menu!

But my daughter became unwell, and then myself. My own mental health hit the decks after a week of being sofa-bound. I wasn’t well enough for many of the strategies I use daily to keep myself mentally well. I told my boss I was too ill to work. And I missed out on a Sarah Millican gig (so essential for mental health!).

And then it hit me.

I told my employer I was too ill to work. And I didn’t spin into a pit of anxiety about work. Because I trust them.

I’m embarrassed to admit this… But in 14 years of working in healthcare and wellbeing, I have never taken a sick day off work without experiencing huge anxiety. I’ve gone into work ill far too many times to mention. Don’t we all? If off sick, I will try to work at home. I’ll always worry. I’ll always expect to be judged. Despite high productivity and performance levels, excellent exam outcomes etc.

Clinicians don’t get ill, do they?

Part of this comes from the presenteeism so rife in the NHS. I’ll never forget one manager boasting of how he drove into work with a broken leg. Part of this comes from neglecting my own health and wellbeing in the past (clinicians and nurses are particularly prone to this too). But part of it comes from the examples set by the bosses and role models I’ve had in the workplace.

Many organisations boast about their employee wellbeing campaigns. They hold mental health awareness days, with cake and flyers. They have employee support helplines. They have fair sickness policies. They have good occupational health support in place. But does any of this have any impact if your employees can’t be honest with you?

If you’re reading this, and you’re the boss, a senior role model, a leader or a decision maker, ask yourself if you set a good example?

Do you openly talk about both physical and mental health? Are you open about your own needs? Do you ask your employees if they’re well? And remind them of the importance of their health? Do you go home if you’re unwell? Do you take time off on holiday? Do you ask employees what they need? And give them the confidence to tell you? Good mental health in the workplace begins with the very basics of how you lead your team.

 

Comic Relief join Evenbreak and challenge diversity apathy

The much-loved British charity, Comic Relief, well known for tackling poverty and social injustice in the UK and around the world, is the latest client to join Evenbreak and commit to advertising all of their job vacancies with us.

Comic Relief is determined to not only attract more, talented disabled candidates, but also to address workplace issues. The charity has signed up for our ‘best practice portal’, a smorgasbord of resources, which guides employers on best practice around inclusion and accessibility in the workplace. We feel it’s like having an expert around to hold your hand! Liz Warner joined Comic Relief as Chief Executive in 2016 and recently spoke out about the lack of diversity in the charity sector.  At a recent NPC event, focused on challenging the sector’s sluggish rate of progress in embracing diversity, Liz said: “I’m still relatively new to the sector. When I joined, I was shocked at the lack of diversity. I feel like there’s a long way to go until the sector is fully inclusive.”

Championing diversity in the Third Sector

Liz added: “Internally, we are putting a real focus on how we can champion diversity.  We have started to share ideas across the organisation about the issues to consider and how we could work in new ways.  The appetite for this is really strong and we are only just getting started.”

Jane Hatton, Founder and Director of Evenbreak, applauds the charity for tackling this issue: “Comic Relief has demonstrated a genuine commitment to inclusion and accessibility and Evenbreak is delighted to be involved in their programme to positively attract disabled candidates.”

Diane Lightfoot is Chief Executive of the Business Disability Forum. She too has urged other charities to step up and lead the way on disability employment. Cost is often touted as the main barrier to diversity initiatives in the third sector. But Diane reminds leaders that ‘a disabled role model costs nothing’. She suggests charities need to ‘live our values and demonstrate what we are campaigning for when it comes to disability in the workplace’.

 

To advertise jobs on Evenbreak click here

 

To find jobs on Evenbreak click here

 

 

Want to learn about diversity and inclusion? 10 books to read…

Last week I was having a big old think. Do some of us only become engaged with inequalities that affect us as individuals? I was more than a little nervous suggesting this. But I got some interesting responses and BOOK RECOMMENDATIONS. Something which always makes me happy. So, without further waffle, here are the 10 books recommended by a bunch of clever folks. Have a read. Or better yet, start your own learning and development library – a small step to make your own workforce more inclusive.

A Dozen Brilliant Reasons to Employ Disabled People: Why successful businesses see inclusion as an asset rather than a problem by Jane Hatton.

If you have ever wanted to understand (or help others understand) the business case for employing disabled people, this is the definitive book for you. Using evidence from a wide range of research, case studies and personal experience, every aspect of the workplace is examined in relation to inclusivity, providing a compelling business case relevant to every sector. “In all our UK internal training on accessibility, it is first on the recommended reading list.” Michael Vermeersch, Digital Inclusion Lead, Microsoft.

What the **** is Normal?! by Francesca Martinez.

If you grow up in a world where wrinkles are practically illegal, going bald is cause for a mental breakdown, and women over size zero are encouraged to shoot themselves (immediately), what the hell do you do if you’re, gasp … DISABLED?
Whatever body you’re born into, the pressure to be normal is everywhere. But have you ever met a normal person? What do they look like? Where do they live? What do they eat for breakfast?
And what the **** does normal mean anyway?
This is the award-winning wobbly comedian Francesca Martinez’s funny, personal, and universal story of how she learned to stick two shaky fingers up to the crazy expectations of a world obsessed with being ‘normal’.

Secrets & Big News: Enabling people to be themselves at work by Kate Nash OBE

Secrets & Big News is an engaging read about the subject of ‘declaration’ and ‘disclosure’ of disability in the workplace. Based on a two-year research project, the book details the reasons why people find it hard to share information and offers ideas for both employers and employees alike. 55 employers took part in the study and together they reached just over 2,500 of their employees who offered their views about what makes it hard to share personal information, as well as what makes it easier. The book is triggering a wave of new conversations between valuable employees and UK and global businesses. The book is not about medicine, politics or disability rights: it’s about what it means to be human and how employers can retain their talented people through periods of ill health and disability.

Why are You Pretending to be Normal? by Phil Friend and Dave Rees.

Do you want to manage your disability positively? Feeling frustrated that people do not understand your needs?

If you have a disability, then you should listen to this audiobook. Why Are You Pretending to Be Normal? asks the questions that anyone with a disability needs to ask themselves.

This engaging story offers viewpoints and ideas that have already inspired many disabled people to stop simply coping with their disability and start managing it. This enables them to lead more productive and fulfilling lives.  Phil Friend and Dave Rees present practical tools and techniques that have helped so many people to successfully tackle some of the most challenging aspects of their disabilities.

The Politics of Disablement by Michael Oliver

Dominant views of disability as an individual and medical problems have been vigorously challenged by disabled people in recent years. This book, by an author who is himself disabled, looks at the individualised and medicalised views of disability, describes the way they have been produced in capitalist society, and analyses the possibilities for change. Essential reading for anyone who wishes to understand the true nature of disability, especially as disability comes to occupy a prominent place on the political agenda.

Pride Against Prejudice: Transforming Attitudes to Disability: A Personal Politics of Disability by Jenny Morris.

“Disabled people throughout the world are increasingly naming and confronting the prejudice which we daily experience, expressing our anger at the discrimination we face, and insisting that our lives have value. This book has grown out of the struggles through which, over the last decade or so, disabled people, and particularly disabled women, have asserted our reality. It is an attempt to analyse the nature of the prejudice we experience and to articulate the growing strength of our pride in ourselves. It has also been within the last decade that I myself developed an identity as a disabled woman, an identity which has been a source of much anger at the prejudice and discrimination that I and other disabled people face. But it is also an identity which has been an increasing source of strength and liberation.” Jenny Morris

The Inclusion Imperative: How Real Inclusion Creates Better Business and Builds Better Societies by Stephen Frost

The Inclusion Imperative showcases the inspiring commitment to inclusion the London Olympic and Paralympic Games’ organizing committee espoused and details the techniques and frameworks that enabled it to truly deliver a ‘Games for everyone’ at London 2012. Diversity and inclusion expert, Stephen Frost, challenges preconceived ideas and strives to inspire professionals to tackle inclusion in their organizations with courage, creativity and talent. With highly relatable examples, The Inclusion Imperative constitutes the best argument to convince sceptics that real diversity and inclusion can deliver more engaged employees and customers, improved employee recruitment and retention, increase productivity and better group decision-making processes.

Real inclusion saves money and improves efficiency in the systems of an organisation, making the world a better place as a by-product.

Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race: The Sunday Times Bestseller by Reni Eddo-Lodge.

The book that sparked a national conversation. Exploring everything from eradicated black history to the inextricable link between class and race, Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race, is the essential handbook for anyone who wants to understand race relations in Britain today.

A revelation … Undoubtedly essential (Spectator)

This is a book that was begging to be written. This is the kind of book that demands a future where we’ll no longer need such a book. Essential (Marlon James, Man Booker Prize-Winner 2015)

Set to blow apart the understanding of race relations in this country (Stylist)

The Spirit Level: Why Equality is Better for Everyone by Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett

Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett’s The Spirit Level: Why Equality is Better for Everyone is the most influential and talked-about book on society in the last decade – now updated with a new chapter on the controversy the book has ignited.

Why do we mistrust people more in the UK than in Japan? Why do Americans have higher rates of teenage pregnancy than the French? What makes the Swedish thinner than the Australians? The answer: inequality. This ground breaking book, based on years of research, provides hard evidence to show: How almost everything – from life expectancy to mental illness, violence to illiteracy – is affected not by how wealthy a society is, but how equal it is. That societies with a bigger gap between rich and poor are bad for everyone in them – including the well-off. How we can find positive solutions and move towards a happier, fairer future.

Demystifying Diversity: A Handbook to Navigate Equality, Diversity and Inclusion by Jiten Patel and Gamiel Yafai.

This engaging and comprehensive tour of the world of diversity in the workplace is authoritative, yet witty and well told. Demystifying Diversity is an important book – a vital navigational tool for anyone getting to grips with the importance of diversity across the spectrum of today’s society.

This book is aimed at anyone with responsibility in company management as well as business professionals and HR practitioners.

 

I’d love to hear about any other recommendations people have. To connect and keep in touch click here.

To advertise jobs on Evenbreak click here

To find jobs on Evenbreak click here

To find out more about best practice around disability in the workplace look here